Guac this Way

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Whether you like it chunky or creamy, spicy or sweet, it’s easy to combine your favorite flavors in guacamole. While there’s nothing wrong with the classic guacamole recipe, why not mix it up with a taste of the tropics or pull inspiration from your garden? Grab some tortilla chips then get dipping with these five guacamole recipes:

Classic Guacamole:

Bowl of guac with ingredients

Ingredients:

  • 2 lg. Hass avocados, diced
  • 1 Lime, juiced
  • ½ Red onion, diced
  • 1 Jalapeño, or more if you prefer spice
  • 1 Garlic clove, minced
  • 1 handful fresh cilantro
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Sprouts Yellow Corn Tortilla Chips

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients, except tortilla chips, to a food processor and pulse until desired consistency is reached.
  2. Serve with Sprouts Yellow Corn Tortilla Chips and enjoy.

Fiery Guacamole

Ingredients:

      • 2 lg. Hass avocados, diced
      • 1 Lime, juiced
      • ½ Red onion, diced
      • 1 Habanero pepper, or more if you prefer spicier
      • 1 Garlic clove, minced
      • 1 handful fresh cilantro
      • 1 tsp. Cumin
      • 1 tsp. Cayenne pepper
      • 1 tsp. Red pepper flakes
      • Salt and pepper, to taste
      • Sprouts White Corn Tortilla Chips

    Instructions:

      1. Add all ingredients, except tortilla chips, into a food processor and pulse until desired consistency.
      2. Serve with Sprouts White Corn Tortilla Chips and enjoy.

 

Bowl of guac with ingredientsGarden Guacamole

Ingredients:

      • 2 lg. Hass avocados, diced
      • 1 Lime, juiced
      • ½ Red onion, diced
      • 1 Jalapeño (optional), finely diced
      • 1 Garlic clove, minced
      • 1 handful fresh cilantro, freshly chopped
      • 1 sm. handful Fresh basil, roughly chopped
      • 1 cup Kale leaves, stems removed and finely chopped
      • 1–2 Roma tomatoes, diced
      • Salt and pepper, to taste
      • Sprouts Ancient Grain Tortilla Chips

Instructions:

  1. In a mortar or large bowl, mash avocado using pestle or fork.
  2. Stir in the rest of the ingredients, except for the chips.
  3. Serve with Sprouts Ancient Grain Tortilla Chips and enjoy.

 

 

 


Tropical Guacamole

Ingredients:

    • 2 lg. Hass avocados, diced
    • 1 Lime, juiced
    • ½ Red onion, diced
    • 1 Jalapeño (optional), finely diced
    • 1 Garlic clove, minced
    • 1 handful fresh cilantro, freshly chopped
    • 1 cup Pineapple, diced
    • 1 cup Mango, diced
    • Salt, to taste
    • Sprouts Plantain Chips

Instructions:

  1. In a mortar or large bowl, mash avocado using pestle or fork.
  2. Stir in the rest of the ingredients, except for the chips.Serve with Sprouts Plantain Chips and enjoy.

 

 

 

 


Bowl of guac with ingredientsSouthwest Guacamole

Ingredients:

  • 2 lg. Hass avocados, diced
  • 1 Lime, juiced
  • ½ Red onion, diced
  • 1 Jalapeño or serrano pepper, finely diced
  • 1 Garlic clove, minced
  • 1 handful fresh cilantro, freshly chopped
  • ½ cup Corn, roasted (optional)
  • ½ cup Black beans
  • 1 tsp. Cumin
  • ½ tsp. Cayenne pepper
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Sprouts Blue Corn Tortilla Chips

Instructions:

  1. In a mortar or large bowl, mash avocado using pestle or fork.
  2. Stir in the rest of the ingredients, except for the chips.
  3. Serve with Sprouts Blue Corn Tortilla Chips and enjoy.

 

 

 


Rosé All May

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If you’re looking for an easy-drinking summer wine, rosé is a crisp, lean, delicious and refreshing option that is easy to shop. Made all around the world, rosé is produced from a variety of red grapes with minimal contact from their grape skins, which results in the soft color.

Shades of Pink

Darker rosé may be slightly richer and can sometimes be a bit fruitier than the paler options, which may suggest floral notes.

Looking for something sweet?

Find one from the U.S., South America or Australia. They’re fruitier, sweeter and usually have a lower alcohol content. Italy, Spain and France will typically provide a crisp and tart wine with an ABV above 11%.

What’s Your Rosé Style?

A wine’s style is represented by its flavor, body and overall taste experience. For Rosé, there are three styles to choose from:

Soft & Off-dry

Offering flavors of berries, cherry, apple and peach. Pairs perfectly with Mexican dishes and spicy curry.


Easy-going & Fruity

Light and refreshing, these styles feature flavors of summer berries and are perfect paired with appetizers, bbq and pizza.


Medium-bodied & Dry

Full flavored with notes of cherry, vanilla, strawberry and even a bit of pepper. Grilled meats, salmon and fresh veggies will make the complete experience for this style.

Spiked Lavender Pink Lemonade

For the Lavender Syrup:

  • Ingredients:
    • 1 cup Water
    • 1 cup Sugar
    • 2 Tbsp. Dried lavender
  • Instructions:
    1. In a small saucepan, bring water and lavender to a boil.
    2. Stir in sugar until completely dissolved.
    3. Reduce heat and simmer for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    4. Let cool and steep for about 15 minutes.
    5. Pour mixture through a strainer, pressing on lavender to get all the syrup out.

For the Lemonade:

  • Ingredients:
    • Lavender simple syrup
    • 1 bottle Sprouts Pink Sparkling Lemonade
    • 1 bottle Rosé
    • Lemons, thinly sliced (for garnish)
    • Lavender springs (for garnish, optional)
  • Instructions:
    1. Fill a large pitcher with ice.
    2. Pour in lavender syrup, lemonade and rosé.
    3. Add lemon slices in to the pitcher and stir.
    4. Pour into ice-filled glasses and garnish with lavender sprigs.

Choosing Non-GMO

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bunch of carrots pulled from the ground with soil and red shovel in background

 

A GMO is a genetically modified organism—a plant, animal, microorganism or other organism—whose genetic makeup has been modified in a laboratory and does not occur in nature. There are two ways to avoid GMOs in your food, both include looking for specific labels on the products you purchase.

USDA Organic label/logoChoose Organic

A great way to avoid GMOs is to buy organic! The USDA Organic standards prohibit the use of GMOs in farming and food processing. Products with the USDA Organic seal are also free from growth hormones and antibiotics, as well as synthetic fertilizers and pesticides. You’ll find thousands of organic products at your local Sprouts.

Visit the USDA Organic website.

Non-GMO Project Verified LogoLook for the Butterfly

You can also look for the Non-GMO Project Verified logo. Since its inception in 2010, this non-profit has been committed to preserving and building the non-GMO food supply, educating consumers and providing verified non-GMO choices. There are now over 43,000 products that are Non-GMO Project Verified. You can find thousands of products with this label at your local Sprouts—just look for the butterfly!

Visit the Non-GMO Project Verified website.

Organic: What’s in a Logo

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agricultural field with tractor and barn in background

Whether you regularly shop organic, or looking to learn more, this article will shed some light on a variety of common and not-so-common logos you see on products you purchase at Sprouts. A product is deemed organic if it is free of synthetic additives including pesticides, chemical fertilizers and dyes. The USDA Organic logo has been in use for nearly two decades, but other logos are new and emerging. It’s an exciting time in the organic field!

 

USDA Organic label/logoUSDA Organic

When you purchase a product with this label on it, you can be assured it’s made with at least 95% organic ingredients and is non-GMO (does not contain genetically modified organisms). The Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 established the National Organic Program, but the use of the logo was not implemented until the early 2000s. You can find thousands of organic products at Sprouts!

Visit the USDA Organic website.

 

transitional certified by QAI logoTransitional Organic Certified by QAI

You might not have seen or noticed this certification logo before—that’s because it’s relatively new. In 2016, this program, certifying at least 51% of the contents are transitional organic, was rolled out. It allows small- and medium-sized farms to transition to organic over a three-year period. The benefits are three-fold: for those smaller farms, it helps to off-set the cost of transitioning their farm to organic. For you, it means more better-for-you choices are available. And for the world at large, this certification is helpful to the organic movement.

Visit the Transitional Organic Certified website.

 

Regenerative Organic Certified logoROC Regenerative Organic Certification

The newest label to the organic family, this certification builds upon the existing USDA Organic seal you’re likely familiar with. In addition to meeting the USDA Organic standards, farmers must also work to increase soil health, animal welfare and worker fairness. Three levels of certification—Bronze, Silver and Gold—ensure progressively more rigorous organic standards.

Learn more: Check out our article about regenerative agriculture and visit the Regenerative Organic Certified website.


Did you know?

Farmers are struggling to keep up with the growing demand for organic products—less than one percent of U.S. farmland is certified organic. Interested to learn more? Check out this history of organic farming!

Vital Farms Story

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Vf Logo Transparency

Vital Farms’ founder Matt O’Hayer’s lifelong love for the egg business began as a teenager back in 1968 when he gave up his Providence, RI, paper route in favor of selling eggs door-to-door. Fast forward to 2007, when, after a series of successful business ventures, Matt and his wife Catherine settled back in Austin, TX, and started raising their first flock of 20 hens on a small piece of land south of the city. The “Egg Man” had come home to roost. Their initial goal was to show that humanely raising hens outdoors with access to open pastures (and all the natural goodness found therein) would produce better quality and more delicious eggs—and their early popularity at Farmers’ Markets around Austin showed that to be the case. From there, it was a short leap into grocery stores, with bigger flocks, better understandings and a plan to scale this method of farming to suit the challenges of commercial production, without compromising the ethical standards that they had established. Those ideas became the foundation of the company’s mission.

Vital Farms Eggs

Newly branded as Vital Farms, the company began to grow, adding new farms to their network, and collaborating with animal welfare groups to codify the farming system and standards that it pioneered, in the process creating a sustainable and scalable farming model that would ensure consistency, quality, and accountability. Those same standards are now applied consistently with the roughly 120 independent family chicken farms that Vital Farms works with—a care for the hens, the land that they roam (our pastures are never treated with chemicals of any kind), the farmers, their communities, all the way through to the folks who experience the joy of a perfect egg every time they crack one open!

In 2015 Vital Farms ventured their first new category, introducing a superior quality, high butter fat, pasture-raised butter to the market, and adding a group of 90 family dairy farms and artisanal butter-makers to their network. While the standards for dairy cattle are obviously very different from those for the hens, Vital Farms’ commitment to quality, animal welfare, and ethical food production remains true to its founders’ vision and mission. Vital Farms also recently opened its first egg packing facility, ‘Egg Central Station’, in Springfield, MO, close to the heart of it’s production center. True to Vital Farms’ standards, the state-of-the-art facility was built with key features to ensure food safety, crew comfort, and safety and environmental considerations. Today, Vital Farms leads the fast-growing pasture-raised egg category it helped pioneer. What started as a belief that there was a better way to produce eggs, turned into a stakeholder-centric, socially-conscious business operating at the highest levels of quality and accountability.

 

Coconut Aminos

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Coconuts are one of our favorite island-fresh, nutty fruits because they’re packed full of flavor and brimming with good-for-you nutrients.

But what are coconut aminos? And why would you want to add them to your shopping basket, let alone food? Are they paleo-friendly? Let’s find out!

Mystery Sauce

Packaged in a bottle, coconut aminos contain just two ingredients, coconut sap and sea salt. Yep, that’s it! Not only is it paleo-friendly, it’s also gluten- and soy-free making it a great addition to your pantry.

Coconut sap is extracted from cut stems and the resulting material is full of potassium, vitamin C, B vitamins and 17 amino acids. Add that to the fact that coconut aminos have a similar and slightly sweeter taste than soy sauce with about one-third less sodium—and that’s tasty news indeed.

Say what?

Oh! And by the way, coconut aminos don’t taste like coconuts! But what can you use this savory-sweet sauce for? It’s a terrific substitute for soy sauce—a non-paleo-friendly condiment since it’s made from a legume. So feel free to use it in any recipe you’re converting to your paleo lifestyle. Or, try these easy recipes below for an amino boost that can’t be beat!

Paleo Salmon Cakes

Salmon cakes over green lettuce with lemon slices on a white plate

 

Thai Beef and Broccoli Soup

green curry soup with broccoli and vegetables in a textured green bowl

 

Slow-Cooker Tangy Pineapple Shredded Beef

glazed shredded beef in a dark-colored bowl

DIY Upcycled Terrarium

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Recycling is what happens when you put things in the recycle bin at home or work. These items (paper, aluminum cans, plastic bottles, etc.) are broken down and recycled into other similar-type products. Upcycling though, is taking something you might put in the recycle bin and turning it into something different—that generally is of greater value than the original object. These DIY upcycled terrariums definitely add value!

DIY Upcycle Terrarium:

Supplies needed:

  • Empty, upcycled glass jars
  • Gloves (optional)
  • Potting soil
  • Funnel
  • Long brush
  • Scoop
  • Dish soap
  • Vinegar
  • Cleaning sponge

Instructions:

  1. Begin by removing labels from empty glass jars: Soak them in warm water with equal parts of dish soap and vinegar.
  2. Carefully peel off the label and scrub the outside of the jar removing any label residue.
  3. Once the glass jar is dry, fill it a quarter of the way with potting soil. (Using a funnel will help when scooping the potting soil into the jar.)
  4. Once potting soil has been added, use the long brush to clean the inside edges of the glass, removing soil from the sides of the bottle. This will help ensure that the plant remains clean when added to the jar.
  5. After adding the potting soil, hold glass jar at a 45-degree angle so that soil falls to one corner of the jar, leaving the opposite side open
  6. Carefully add your fern or plant to the jar. Using chopsticks, maneuver the plant so that its roots rest on the bottom of the jar—in the space on the opposite side of the soil.
  7. Once plant is placed, carefully fill the gap at the bottom with the soil so that the roots of the plant are covered and the plant sits up once you bring the bottle to a fully upright position again.
  8. Again, using the long brush, brush the sides of the glass bottle cleaning the dirt from the edges.
  9. Finally, decorate the jar with twine and a tag then place terrarium in an area with sufficient sunlight but avoid direct sun.
  10.  Add a small amount of water when soil is try but be sure not to over water the plant.

 

Shelf Life & Product Date Labeling

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The USDA estimates we waste 30 percent of all food due to consumers throwing away wholesome food due to expiration dates.

Manufacturers provide dating to help consumers decide when food is of best quality. With the exception of infant formula, dates are not an indicator of the product’s safety and are not actually required by federal law.

Examples of commonly used phrases:

Best if Used By/Before” indicates when a product will be of best flavor or quality. It is not a date determined for safety.
“Sell–By” date tells the store how long to display the product for sale for inventory management. It is not a safety date.
“Use–By” date is the last date recommended for the use of the product while at peak quality. It is not a safety date, except when used on infant formula.

HELPFUL REMINDERS:

Shelf Life & Product Date Labeling

With the exception of infant formula, if the date passes during home storage, a product should still be safe and wholesome if handled properly until the time spoilage is obvious. Spoiled foods will develop an off odor, flavor or texture due to naturally occurring spoilage bacteria.

Spoilage bacteria cause foods to develop unpleasant characteristics, but do not cause illness. A change in the color of meat or poultry is not actually an indicator of spoilage.

Some state egg laws may require a “Sell-By” or “Expiration” date, but it is not a federal regulation.

Cans must exhibit a code or the date of canning, which is mainly used as a way to track the product. These codes are not meant for the consumer to interpret as a “Best if Used By” date. Cans that are dented, rusted or swollen should be discarded.

In an effort to reduce food waste, put your newer items in the back of your refrigerator or pantry. That way, older items will be front and center and you’ll be more likely to use them before they go bad. It’s important that consumers understand that food products are usually safe to consume past the date on the label. Evaluate the quality of your food products prior to eating, and discard if there are noticeable changes in wholesomeness.

NOTE: Do not buy or use baby formula after its “Use-By” date.

To learn more, check out Food Safety and Inspection Service’s information on food product dates.

Cleaning and Sanitizing

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Illness causing bacteria can survive in many places around your kitchen, such as your hands, utensils and cutting boards. Reduce the risk of spreading bacteria to your food and your family by washing your hands, utensils and surfaces often and the right way.

  • Wash your hands briskly for at least 20 seconds with warm running water and plain soap.
  • Rinse them well and dry them with a clean towel.

Everyone in your family should always wash their hands:
o Before eating food.
o Before, during and after preparing food.
o Before and after treating a cut or wound.
o Before and after caring for someone who is sick.
o After handling uncooked eggs or raw meat, poultry or seafood.
o After blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.
o After touching an animal.
o After touching garbage.
o After using the toilet.

Bacteria can also be spread throughout your kitchen if food contact surfaces and utensils are not cleaned and sanitized frequently. Remember these tips to alleviate the spread of bacteria in your home:

  • After preparing each food item, thoroughly wash your cutting boards, dishes, utensils and countertops.
  • Use a clean cloth to wipe up spills and kitchen surfaces.
  • And as an extra precaution, add one tablespoon of liquid chlorine bleach to one gallon of water and use it to sanitize washed surfaces and utensils in your home kitchen.

For additional Food Safety cleaning facts, refer to foodsafety.gov.

Cooking Temperature Basics

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One way to stay safe is to make sure you’re cooking foods to the right temperatures. Cook all food to these minimum internal temperatures, and always use a food thermometer to confirm they are done. (You may choose to cook food to higher temperatures based on personal preference.)

ProductMinimum Internal Temperature
All Poultry (breasts, whole bird, legs, thighs, & wings, ground poultry, and stuffing165°F
Beef, Pork, Veal & Lamb Steaks, chops, roasts145°F and allow to rest for at least 3 minutes
Eggs160°F
Fish & Shellfish145°F
Fully Cooked HamReheat cooked hams packaged in USDA inspected plants to 140°F; all others to 165°F
Ground meats160°F
Ham, fresh or smoked (uncooked)145°F
Leftovers & Casseroles165°F

If you have a question about meat, poultry or egg products, call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline toll free at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854). The Hotline is open year-round Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ET (English or Spanish). Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a

day. Check out the Food Safety Inspection Service’s website at www.fsis.usda.gov.