Organic: What’s in a Logo

Share article Organic: What’s in a Logo on:
FacebookTwitterPinterestPrint

agricultural field with tractor and barn in background

Whether you regularly shop organic, or looking to learn more, this article will shed some light on a variety of common and not-so-common logos you see on products you purchase at Sprouts. A product is deemed organic if it is free of synthetic additives including pesticides, chemical fertilizers and dyes. The USDA Organic logo has been in use for nearly two decades, but other logos are new and emerging. It’s an exciting time in the organic field!

 

USDA Organic label/logoUSDA Organic

When you purchase a product with this label on it, you can be assured it’s made with at least 95% organic ingredients. The Organic Foods Production Act of 1990 established the National Organic Program, but the use of the logo was not implemented until the early 2000s. You can find thousands of organic products at Sprouts!

Visit the USDA Organic website.

 

transitional certified by QAI logoTransitional Organic Certified by QAI

You might not have seen or noticed this certification logo before—that’s because it’s relatively new. In 2016, this program, certifying at least 51% of the contents are transitional organic, was rolled out. It allows small- and medium-sized farms to transition to organic over a three-year period. The benefits are three-fold: for those smaller farms, it helps to off-set the cost of transitioning their farm to organic. For you, it means more better-for-you choices are available. And for the world at large, this certification is helpful to the organic movement.

Visit the Transitional Organic Certified website.

 

Regenerative Organic Certified logoROC Regenerative Organic Certification

The newest label to the organic family, this certification builds upon the existing USDA Organic seal you’re likely familiar with. In addition to meeting the USDA Organic standards, farmers must also work to increase soil health, animal welfare and worker fairness. Three levels of certification—Bronze, Silver and Gold—ensure progressively more rigorous organic standards.

Visit the Regenerative Organic Certified website.

Did you know: Farmers are struggling to keep up with the growing demand for organic products—less than one percent of U.S. farmland is certified organic. Interested to learn more? Check out this history of organic farming!