St. Patrick’s Day Recipes

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Looking to for ways to get green this St. Patrick’s Day? These recipes from our blogger friends are straight from the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow!

Avocado Hummus

You’ll be over the rainbow for this Avocado Hummus with homemade tortilla chips in the shape of shamrocks! Recipe provided by our blogger friend, Karman at The Nutrition Adventure.

Avocado Hummus by TheNutritionAdventureIngredients:

  • 4 12-inch Whole wheat tortillas
  • 1/4 cup Extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 15.5 oz. can Great Northern Beans
  • 1 Avocado
  • 1/4 cup Fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1 Large garlic clove
  • 1/2 Jalapeno, seeds and ribs removed
  • 1/8 tsp. Salt
  • Cooking spray
  • Cayenne pepper, to taste

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and line a 18×13 baking sheet with aluminum foil. Spray the foil with cooking spray.
  2. Serve hummus with tortilla chips and fresh vegetables, if desired. Keep hummus in an air-tight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.
  3. While the tortilla chips are baking, prepare hummus by combining the olive oil, beans, avocado, cilantro, lime juice, garlic, jalapeno, cumin, salt, and cayenne pepper in a food processor or blender, processing until smooth. If more liquid is needed to make the hummus smooth, add 1 tablespoon of water at a time until desired consistency is achieved.
  4. Place baking sheet in the oven and bake for 10 minutes, turning the tortillas over half way through baking. Allow tortilla chips to cool thoroughly.
  5. Use a shamrock-shaped cookie cutter, or a circle cookie cutter, to cut out tortilla chips. Place the cut tortillas on the baking sheet, being sure to not overlap. Spray the tortillas with cooking spray and sprinkle with kosher salt.

Broccoli Soup

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with a creamy and decadent bowl of warm broccoli cheddar soup, topped with shamrock-shaped croutons. Recipe provided by our blogger friend, Ericka, at Nibbles and Feasts.

Ingredients: Broccoli Soup by NibblesAndFeasts

  • 2 Tbsp. Olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups White onion, chopped
  • 2 Celery stalks, chopped
  • 5 cups Broccoli florets, save a few for garnish
  • 1 Medium Yukon gold potato, chopped
  • 4 cups Sprouts Vegetable Broth
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Black pepper
  • 1 cup Milk (2% or whole)
  • 2 cups Cheddar cheese, grated
  • 4 Large garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tsp. Dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. Dried thyme, crumbled
  • 1/2 tsp.Black pepper
  • 1/2 cup Olive oil
  • 6 slices Sour Dough bread

Instructions:

  1. For the soup: Heat oil in a large saucepan. Add onion and cook for 5-7 minutes, until tender. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute.
  2. Add celery, broccoli and potato. Cook for 2 minutes and stir in vegetable broth, 1 teaspoon salt and pepper. Cover and simmer for 20 minutes or until potato is soft.
  3. Transfer to a blender and blend until smooth or blend with an immersion blender in the saucepan. If blended in a blender, return soup to saucepan, add milk and stir in cheese until it melts. Serve. Garnish with small broccoli florets and croutons.
  4. For croutons: Preheat oven to 350° F. Combine garlic, oregano, thyme, 1/2 teaspoon salt, pepper and oil in a small saucepan over low medium heat. Bring to simmer for 5 minutes.
  5. Cut out bread with a 2-inch shamrock cookie cutter. Cut any remaining bread in cubes.
  6. Arrange shamrock cutout bread and cubes in one layer on a baking sheet. Brush with oil mixture on all sides. Bake for 12-14 minutes until gold and crispy. Serve as soup topping.

Cookies and Cream Shamrock Cookies

These cookies can be cut into any shape, but they’re perfectly cute for St. Patrick’s Day in a simple shamrock shape. Topped with buttercream frosting, these cookies are flavorful and delicious. Recipe provided by our blogger friend, Glory at Glorious Treats

Cookies and Cream shamrock cookies by abakershouseIngredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups All-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup Crushed chocolate sandwich cookie crumbs (about eight)
  • 1 tsp. Baking powder
  • 1/2 + 1/4 tsp. Salt
  • 1 1/2 cups Unsalted butter
  • 1 cup Sugar
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 1/2 tsp. Vanilla extract
  • 2 oz. Cream cheese
  • 2 cups Powdered sugar
  • Natural green food coloring

Instructions:

  1. For the cookies: Add chocolate sandwich cookies to a large zipper lock bag and crush (with a rolling pin) until crumbs. Measure out crumbs, making sure to scrape the inside of the bag as needed to get all the bits. You do not need to remove the filling from the cookies.
  2. Add 3/4 cup crumbs into a large bowl with flour, then add baking powder and salt and set aside.
  3. In the bowl of an electric mixer, add 1 cup butter (cold, but cut into pieces) and blend until butter is smooth.
  4. Add sugar and blend until well combined and fluffy.
  5. Add egg and 1 teaspoon vanilla and blend until fully incorporated.
  6. With the mixer on low, slowly add the flour/crumb mixture. Blend until all ingredients are combined and the dough begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl.
  7. Remove dough and roll out on a lightly floured work surface, or roll out between two sheets of plastic wrap (and then no flour is needed). Roll to dough to about 3/8″ thick. Cutout desired shapes and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a Silpat type liner.
  8. Chill entire baking sheet of cookies (in the fridge) while you heat the oven to 350F. Bake cookies for about 10 minutes, or until the top surface of the cookies not longer looks moist. Allow to cool a few minutes on the baking sheet, then move to a cooling rack. Cool completely before frosting.
  9. For the frosting: In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat 1/2 cup butter until smooth. Add cream cheese and continue to blend until fully smooth.
  10.  Add 1 cup of powdered sugar and blend. Add 1/4 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. vanilla and continue to blend.
  11. Add second cup of powdered sugar and mix until smooth and fluffy. Add food coloring, as desired.
  12. Spread frosting onto fully cooled cookies, or add frosting to a piping bag and fill in the cookies with a tight zig-zag pattern (as shown).

Shamrock Spinach Pancakes

You’ll be surprised to find out these family-friendly pancakes don’t have an overwhelming taste of spinach and will make eating a healthier breeze. Recipe provided by our blogger friend, Holly Baker at A Bakers House.

Note: If you’d like to make shamrock shaped pancakes, place a metal cookie cutter sprayed with baking spray on your heated pan. Fill with a thin layer of spinach pancake batter. Wait until bubbles form then remove the cookie cutter with tongs (the cookie cutter will be HOT!), flip the pancake and cook for an additional 30 seconds. Spray the cookie cutter again before using for the next pancake.

Ingredients: Spinach Pancakes by abakershouse

  • 1 2/3 cups Gluten-free pancake mix
  • 1 1/2 cups Water
  • 1/2 cup Tightly packed fresh spinach leaves
  • 1/2 cup Sprouts Organic Maple Syrup
  • 2 Tbsp. Sprouts unsalted butter
  • Baking Spray

Instructions:

  1. Heat a large pan or griddle over medium-high heat. Spray with baking spray.
  2. Pour batter onto the heated pan. Wait until bubbles start to form in the middle of the pancake, then flip and cook for another 30 seconds.
  3. Serve with butter and syrup.

Egg-ucation

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Get Eggucated

What Does Your Egg Carton Label Mean?

Eggs may only come in one shape, but Sprouts has numerous options to choose from. How can you be sure you’re making an egg-ucated decision about the type, size and color?

Animal welfare is of the utmost importance to Sprouts, and we hold both our suppliers and ourselves to high standards in regard to supply chain transparency. All of our egg suppliers are required to meet or exceed USDA Food Safety and Inspection Services Standards, and any cage-free supplier must also meet or exceed animal welfare standards such as Certified Humane certification criteria outlined by Humane Farm Animal Care, among other nationally recognized programs.

EGG CARTON TERMS

Pasture Raised

The HFAC’s Certified Humane® requirement is 1,000 birds per 2.5 acres (108 sq. ft. per bird) and the fields must be rotated. The hens must be outdoors year-round, and have mobile or fixed housing where they can go inside at night for protection from predators. They can also be housed indoors for up to two weeks due to inclement weather.

Free Range

This label is regulated by the USDA and indicates that the flock was provided shelter in a building, room or area with unlimited access to food, fresh water and continuous access to the outdoors during their production cycle. The outdoor area may or may not be fenced and/or covered with netting-like material.

Cage Free

This label indicates that the flock was able to freely roam in a building, room or enclosed area with unlimited access to food and fresh water during their production cycle.

Organic

The organic standards describe the specific requirements that must be verified by a USDA-accredited certifying agent before products can be labeled USDA Organic. Overall, organic operations must demonstrate that they are protecting natural resources, conserving biodiversity and using only approved substances. Organic eggs come from chickens treated with the same animal welfare standards as free-range and are given non-GMO feed.

Pasteurized

This label indicates eggs were heated in a sanitary facility under the supervision of the USDA. In pasteurization, the liquid part of the egg is rapidly heated and held at a minimum required temperature for a specific amount of time. This destroys salmonella, but does not cook the eggs or affect color, flavor or nutritional value. By law, all liquid eggs must be pasteurized.

Omega-3 or DHA

These are from hens that have been fed a diet supplemented by a source of omega-3 fatty acids (typically from flax seed).

No Added Hormones

A similar claim includes “Raised without Hormones.” Federal regulations have never permitted hormones or steroids in poultry, pork or goat.

White or Brown

Color is not a reflection of quality and is not a factor in the U.S. Standards, Grades, and Weight Classes for Shell Eggs. Eggs are simply sorted for color and marketed as either “white” or “brown” eggs.

It is common that brown eggs are bigger in size, which is usually due to the breed of chicken laying the eggs. For this reason, brown eggs cost more to produce and are typically found at a higher price point.

 

Celebrate Citrus!

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Winter days somehow seem happier when you start peeling a citrus fruit and spray the room with a little taste of the tropics. Your local Sprouts store may carry some or all of the following fruits, depending on what crops are available.

Bowl full of limes, oranges and lemons

Blood Oranges

You wouldn’t really know what awaits inside these smaller, relatively thin-skinned reddish-orange fruits. But the flesh is usually a vivid blood-red color that has overtones of raspberry and strawberry. Blood oranges are less acidic than most other varieties.

Cara Cara Oranges

These oranges—a special varietal of navels—are very low in acid, so their sweet, slightly complex berry-like flavor really comes through. They are typically bright and glossy, with a surprising slight rosy hue to the flesh. Cara Caras were first discovered in the tropics of South America in 1976.

Gold Nuggets

This seedless mandarin has a bumpy, easy-to-peel, aromatic skin with a delicious sweet flavor. They’re named after the gold once found in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains where they’re grown today.

Meyer Lemons

With a darker golden-hued flesh than their common counter parts, Meyer lemons are a bright sparkle in the citrus world. They’re also sweeter than the lemons you’re used to—that’s because they’re less acidic and tangy. Other differences include their smaller, more round shape and thin, edible skin.

Pummelos

Don’t let the size intimidate you! Beneath the thick rind, these giants of the citrus world have a flesh that ranges in color from creamy white to bright pink. They’re sweeter and less tangy than the smaller grapefruit and have a tropical aroma.

Ruby Tangos

A cross between a blood orange and a clementine, Ruby Tangos have a deep orange, very smooth and easy-to-peel rind. They’re seedless and have a hint of berry flavor like the blood oranges they come from.

Seedless Lemons

These are just as delicious and bright as your favorite lemons, but without the hassle of seeds. Grown from a natural hybrid stock, seedless lemons were initially used by restaurants to save time and reduce waste—now you can too!

Sumo Citrus®

With a rich history dating back to 1970s Japan, these oversized mandarins were bred to combine the easy-to-peel, Japanese Satsuma with the sweet, juicy California orange. Sumo Citrus® have a bumpy, loose peel and sport a topknot with a perfectly balanced, sweet citrus flavor.

Uniq Fruit

They may look funny—some might even say ugly (they’re also known as Ugli® fruit)—but this member of the citrus family has a beautiful sunny golden interior. When removed, the knobby, mottled and puffy thick skin reveals a super juicy, and surprisingly sweet flavor reminiscent of a mandarin and grapefruit.

Vintage Navels

These oranges are grown from heirloom navel oranges, but that is where the similarity to the navel oranges ends. Their higher sugar levels lend to a luscious aroma and the ultimate, perfect orange sweetness.


We’ve got a great selection of the sweetest citrus in season—some of them for a limited time.

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Top 9: Powerful Probiotic Foods

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Bacteria have a reputation for causing disease, so the idea of tossing down a few billion a day for your health might seem—literally and figuratively—hard to swallow. But a growing body of scientific evidence suggests that you can treat and even prevent some illnesses with foods and supplements containing certain kinds of live bacteria. More people are starting to consume these beneficial microorganisms, called probiotics (from pro and biota, meaning “for life”).

Yogurt:

One of the most popular probiotic foods is live-cultured yogurt, but be sure to read the ingredients list, as not all yogurts are made equally. Look for brands such as Brown Cow, which include lactobacillus, acidophilus and other probiotic cultures.

Kefir:

Similar to yogurt, this fermented dairy product is a unique combination of milk and fermented kefir grains. It has a slightly acidic and tart flavor with a hint of bready-yeastiness (but that is usually more noticed in the smell than the taste). Kefir is similar to yogurt, but because it is fermented with yeast and more bacteria, the final product has more probiotics.

Glass bottle of milk, yogurt and vitamins

Sauerkraut:

Made from fermented cabbage and other veggies, sauerkraut is not only extremely rich in healthy live cultures, but also aids in reducing allergy symptoms. Sauerkraut—and the similar but spicy Korean dish, kimchi—is also loaded with immune-boosting vitamins that may help ward off infection.

Soft Cheese:

Goat’s milk and soft cheese are particularly high in probiotics, including thermophillus, bifudus, bulgaricus and acidophilus.

Dark Chocolate:

Probiotics can be added to high-quality dark chocolate, up to four times the amount of probiotics as many forms of dairy. This is only one of the health benefits of chocolate.

Miso Soup:

Miso is one the main-stays of Japanese traditional medicine that can really get your digestive system moving. Made from fermented rye, beans, rice or barley, adding a tablespoon of miso to some hot water makes an excellent, quick, probiotic-rich soup, full of lactobacilli and bifidus bacteria. Beyond its important live cultures, miso is extremely nutrient-dense.

Pickles:

Believe it or not, the common green pickle is an excellent food source of probiotics. When looking to pickles for probiotics, opt for naturally fermented varieties where vinegar wasn’t used in the pickling process. A sea salt and water solution encourages the growth of beneficial bacteria and may give sour pickles some digestive benefits.

Tempeh:

A great substitute for meat or tofu, tempeh is a probiotic-rich grain made from fermented soy beans. A great source of vitamin B-12, this vegetarian food can be sautéed, baked or eaten crumbled on salads. If prepared correctly, tempeh is also very low in salt, which makes it an ideal choice for those on a low-sodium diet.

Kombucha:

An acquired taste due to its sour flavor and fermented odor, kombucha has been around for more than 2,000 years and has a rich anecdotal history of preventing and fighting cancer, arthritis and other degenerative diseases. In fact, according to a Los Angeles Times article, people with HIV made kombucha popular in the 1980s. People drank it to boost their immune systems, increase energy, improve their skin and nails and strengthen thinning hair. These health benefits have not been scientifically proven. However, research shows antioxidant properties in kombucha help boost immunity and energy levels. As a probiotic beverage, it may improve digestion.


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Your Paleo Recipe Resource

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The basics of the Paleo diet are pretty simple, but having some tried-and-true recipes in your back pocket help ensure your success at staying on track with your healthy choices. We’ve gathered some of our faves that are sure to become some of yours!

Breakfast ham and egg cups

Breakfast

Always a plus, both of these breakfasts can be made ahead. The Ham-n-Egg cups are an easy traditional take on breakfast. The chia pudding is packed with nutrients, plus the MCT oil will help keep you going!

Ham-n-Egg Cups

Paleo Chia Seed Pudding with MCT Oil

one pot meals broccoli soup

One-Pot Meals

Nourishing comfort food, soup and chili recipes make mealtime so easy. These are Paleo-perfect and hearty enough to be a meal on their own.

Thai Beef and Broccoli Soup

Paleo Pumpkin Chili with Turkey

Sides of mashed potatoes

Sides

Pair one of these sides with your meat of choice and salad, and you’ll have dinner on the table in no time. Bonus: the cauliflower potato salad is a great choice for your next potluck.

Parsnip and Turnip Mash

Easy Cauliflower Potato Salad

Green Beans Wrapped in Bacon over Pears

Dinner Chicken with Carrots

Dinner

Paired with greens of your choice, these three recipes make for easy weeknight dinners. The salmon cakes can be made ahead and reheated making them a good choice for planned-overs. Leftover steak could be added to a dinner-sized salad tomorrow. Endless, easy possibilities!

Oven Roasted Chicken

Jalapeño Grilled New York Steak

Paleo Salmon Cakes

Holiday Hosting

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Holiday Recipes

Tis the season to celebrate! Whether you’re planning a cozy get-together with close friends, hosting the family or going all out, Sprouts has you covered. Share some of these inspired appetizers at your next holiday gathering. And if you’re feeling pinched for time, make shopping easy and have it delivered!

Power Up with Probiotics

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Bowl of kimchiGut health is one of the hot topics in nutrition research right now. It turns out, the bacteria that take up residence in your belly may play a significant role in wellness. Indeed, studies have found a healthy gut can support your immune system and shows promise in decreasing risk for colon cancer, food allergies, inflammatory bowel disease and obesity.

Although research is still in the works, one thing is certain: when it comes to good bacteria, strength comes in numbers. With that in mind, here are three types of food you can add to your diet to boost beneficial bacteria.

Load Up on Fiber

Good bacteria feast on fiber and need it for survival. Aim for a diet of fiber-rich foods, such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, whole grains, beans and legumes. The Bulk Department and Produce Department at Sprouts are great places to start.

Minimize Processed Food

This is just one more reason to eat a real-food diet. Some research has shown that certain additives, such as artificial sweeteners, can alter gut bacteria. Plus, a diet of processed food probably means you’re not getting enough fiber to help those healthy bacteria thrive.

Include Probiotic Foods

Seek out foods that are naturally rich in good bacteria, otherwise known as probiotics. These include:

  • Fermented Vegetables – Products such as Farmhouse Culture Kimchi or Wild Brine Kraut add flavor to the plate along with good-for-you bacteria.
  • Yogurt – Yogurt is inoculated with two primary strains of bacteria, which is what gives it that pleasingly tangy flavor.
  • Kefir – Another probiotic-rich option in the dairy aisle that’s similar in consistency to drinkable yogurt.
  • Miso & Tempeh – These two ingredients are derived from fermented soy and one more way to work good bacteria into your diet.
  • Probiotic Supplements – In addition to food sources, a probiotic supplement is another option for upping your intake.

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Katie Morford of Mom's Kitchen Handbook

About Katie Morford

Katie Morford is a writer, cookbook author, registered dietitian and mother of three. She has published two cookbooks, Rise & Shine (Roost Books, 2016) and Best Lunch Box Ever (Chronicle Books, 2013). Her work has been featured in Cooking Light, Oprah, Real Simple, Bon Appetit, Parents, Redbook, the New York Times and the San Francisco Chronicle. She is the voice behind the award-nominated blog Mom’s Kitchen Handbook: Raising Fresh-Food Kids in a French-Fried World and blogs regularly on the Huffington Post. She lives with her husband and three daughters in San Francisco.

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Destress with Ashwagandha

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2018 1031 Destress with Ashwaganda

Looking for a natural way to handle stress? Ashwagandha is your herb! It has been used for centuries to promote mental and physical health. With holidays right around the corner, look to this energy-restoring herb to help support both mental and physical health.

Its Latin name is Withania somnifera, but ashwagandha is also known as Indian ginseng or winter cherry, and is part of the nightshade family. Taken from the root, ashwagandha has been used for centuries in the traditional Indian medical practice known as Ayurveda.

Combating Stress

An adaptogen, ashwagandha acts as a stress reliever and balancer. Adaptogens are known to increase the body’s resistance to stress and exert a positive effect on the various systems, including immune, nervous and cardiovascular function.

Immune & Adrenal Support

The holiday season is known for increasing stress levels and time spent with large groups of people, both contributors that can lead to the unfortunate side effect of sickness. That’s why it’s important that your immune system be at its best!

Ashwagandha is particularly helpful in lowering your stress levels and helping balance your immune system by supporting the body’s ability to fight off stress and sickness. When your body is in balance, your adrenals can respond more effectively to create a healthier stress response to a hectic holiday season.

Did you know? The Sanskrit word ashwagandha is a combination of ashva, meaning horse, and gandha, meaning smell, and refers to the strong smell of the plant’s root.

Help Shorten Cold & Flu Symptoms

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Colorful, tasty and beneficial for the body, the European elder tree is native to Europe and parts of Asia and Africa. The flowers are white with green berries that turn red, then black when fully ripe. Both berries and flowers have been used in folk medicine for centuries to treat digestive disorders, influenza, colds, sinusitis and other allergy symptoms.
Bunches of elderberries on light wood

A Concentrated Antioxidant

Elderberries are a concentrated source of two antioxidants: quercetin and anthocyanin. These powerful antioxidants enhance the body’s immune response by increasing the production of cytokines. Cytokines are the immune system’s messengers, helping to regulate the body’s response to disease, inflammation and infection. The high antioxidant capacity in elderberries neutralizes harmful free radicals and protects the body against illness and disease.

Excellent Source of Vitamins A and C

Elderberries are also an excellent source of vitamins A and C. Vitamin C is a strong antioxidant, which is part of what makes it a great addition to your wellness routine. Vitamin A helps with the formation of white blood cells essential to your body’s defense against illness. Together, they make an outstanding one-two punch to assist in warding off those pesky bugs that make the rounds this season.

Enhancing Immunity Quickens Recovery

Elderberry’s high antioxidants, as well as its high content of vitamins A and C are compelling reasons to try elderberry next time you feel you might be fighting a bug.


Did you know? Elderberry significantly more antioxidant capacity than either blueberries or cranberries.


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i Eur Cytokine Netw. 2001 Apr-Jun;12 (2):290-6.

Fall into Seasonal Wellness

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The days are getting shorter, there’s a crispness in the air and the leaves are becoming crunchy and colorful—there’s no denying it, fall is in full swing! Time to dust off those boots, pull out those sweaters and prepare for the cooler weather and stresses that naturally come with transitioning into a new season. Between holiday traveling and jam-packed schedules, it’s important to keep you and your family feeling your best as winter quickly approaches. Here are our top tips to make this your healthiest autumn yet:

Fall Into Seasonal Wellness

Get Outdoors

The sweltering summer heat has come to an end and the icy winter air has not yet approached. It’s the perfect time to throw on a scarf and enjoy the outdoors. Gather friends and family for a fall picnic or head over to the pumpkin patch and corn maze. Soaking up the sun makes for happy memories and a healthier you.

­

Get Moving

While cozying up on the couch may sound tempting, it’s important to continue exercising throughout the fall and winter seasons both for physical and mental health. Enjoy the fresh fall breeze and go for a walk or skip hitting the snooze button and go for an early morning workout.

Support Your Immune System

Feel your best this season! To maintain a healthy immune system these products may just be what you are looking for. Our Sprouts Fizzy Vitamin C packs 1,000 milligrams of vitamin C as well as antioxidants, electrolytes, essential nutrients and B vitamins to help you stay on top of the season. Gaia Herbs’ Black Elderberry and Source Natural’s Wellness Formula both help to maintain your immunity as well. If you’re already feeling down, try Gaia Herbs’ Turmeric Supreme Immune A.S.A.P., Herb Pharm’s Rapid Immune Boost or Boiron’s Oscillococcinum to get on your feet again.

Stress Less

Along with the joy and excitement of this season, comes stress and anxiety. When you feel like your emotions are getting the best of you, try Natural Factors’ Mind Retreat or Nelson Bach’s Rescue Remedy. Don’t forget about your furry friends either, try Nelson Bach’s Rescue Remedy for Pets.

Get Plenty of Zzzs

Preparing for the holidays and resetting your fall schedule can leave you short on time and sleep. It’s important to maintain a consistent sleep schedule so that you can enjoy every moment that this season has to offer. Promote relaxation and sleep quality with Natural Factors’ Stress Relax Tranquil Sleep, Genexa’s Sleepology® or Sleep Rejuvenation™ from Source Naturals®.

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