Spring Break Travel Snack Tips

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by Mary Ellen Phipps, MPH, RDN, LD founder of milkandhoneynutrition.com

It’s hard to believe, but winter is quickly coming to an end and before we know it spring will be here bringing warmer temps, yummy produce and the start of a big travel season.

Bento-box-style snack boxes with fruit, vegetables and sandwiches.

Why Be Prepared

Whether you’re just making a day trip with the kids to your local zoo, setting out across the country for a fun-filled road trip, or hopping on a two-hour flight to your closest beach, there are a few reasons to make sure you come prepared with snacks from home.

Cost: Buying snack foods in airports, or convenience stores is far more expensive than purchasing them at your local grocery store or making them at home.

Gut health: The stress of travel alone can often throw gut bacteria out of whack. New-to-you snack foods purchased while traveling may create some GI distress as well. It’s a good idea to pack some tried-and-true favorites.

Immune health: Our immune systems can be another victim of travel stress. If we’re not fueling our bodies properly, our immune system could take an even bigger hit – making us more prone to getting sick.

A Few Things to Keep in Mind

Day Trip

Taking a day trip allows you the flexibility to pack both shelf-stable and refrigerated snacks in a cooler.  If you plan to be gone all day, remember to pack substantial foods as well. Freezing some beverages and ice packs will keep things nice and cool. Any food that is supposed to be refrigerated should be kept on ice as long as possible. Once it is taken out of the cooler (or the cooler is no longer below 40°F), it should be consumed within two to four hours. If you’re ever in doubt, just throw it out.

Day-Trip Snacks

  • Popcorn
  • Dark chocolate rice cakes
  • Bananas
  • Oranges
  • Energy bites

Cooler Snacks

  • Berries
  • Yogurt
  • Flavored water
  • Sandwiches
  • Chicken salad
  • Snacking cheese

Longer Road Trip

For longer road trips, you’ll want to keep the same food safety precautions in mind as you would on day trips. Keep in mind that cooler snacks will only last one day or less depending on the length of your trip. If your road trip will be longer than one day, try to scout out your favorite grocery stores along the route—stocking up on refrigerated goods as you make your way to your destination. Some of my preferred shelf-stable, travel-friendly snacks include:

  • 100% uncured beef sticks
  • Oat bites
  • Apple sauce
  • Nut butter
  • Whole-grain bread
  • Breakfast cereal
  • Snack-size bars
  • Nut butter pouches
  • Other shelf-stable produce options like apples and grapes

Plane Trip 

Plane trips are a bit different when it comes to picking out your snacks. You’ll need to consider what will fit in your carry-on bag as well as what security will allow you to bring. If you bring a cooler, make sure all the ice packs are frozen solid. Anything that is not frozen, including foods, beverages, and ice packs is subject to the TSA’s 3-1-1 rule.

Plane trips are the perfect opportunity to shop delicious bulk snacks in the Bulk Department, where you can choose the amount that best fits in your luggage. Easy-to-pack items include:

  • Walnuts
  • Chocolate-covered almonds
  • Pistachios
  • Dried mangos
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Plantain chips
  • Granola

Whatever your plans are this spring break, whether you’re traveling cross country or to the nearby park, make sure to stop by your local Sprouts to find your favorite travel-friendly snacks!


 

Influencer - Mary Ellen - Milk & Honey Nutrition

About Mary Ellen

Mary Ellen Phipps, MPH, RDN, LD, is the Registered Dietitian, mom, food blogger and recipe developer behind milkandhoneynutrition.com. She’s also a type 1 diabetic and firmly believes food should bring us joy, not stress. Mary Ellen makes healthy eating easy, realistic and most importantly … fun! Visit her website and you’ll find yummy low-sugar, diabetes-friendly recipes the whole family will love … as well as helpful tips and a little mom humor.

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Eat the Rainbow: Green Foods for St. Patrick’s Day

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by Kristina LaRue, RD, CSSD, founder of love & zest

There are so many fun and colorful ways to jazz up meal time with food! Eating the rainbow is easy with an endless amount of produce options—there’s a fruit and veggie for every color of the rainbow.

With St. Patrick’s Day right around the corner, it’s time to pull out all things green—including fruits and veggies! Sprouts has all the green foods you need to make this St. Patrick’s Day the best one yet.

Fresh green fruits and vegetables, with green drinkLet’s Chat Green Fruits

Avocados contain twice the potassium of a banana (gram for gram). Potassium is important for blood pressure and nerve function. Avocados also boast gamma-tocopherol, a defender against disease-provoking compounds in the body. If you’re craving avocado, check out this recipe for Avocado Chicken Caesar Salad, featuring creamy avocado dressing.

Granny Smith apples are an excellent source of vitamin C and dietary fiber. The polyphenolic compounds found in apples are phytonutrients that help protect against free radicals in the body. Apples can be enjoyed many different ways like in this recipe for Caramel Apple Oatmeal.

Kiwi may look foreign on the outside with its fuzzy skin, but there’s nothing weird about its health benefits! Did you know you can even eat the skin? Packed with vitamin C, dietary fiber, vitamin K and vitamin E, kiwi makes a great addition to smoothies and a tangy salad topping. Try it in this Summer Superfood Smoothie Bowl.

Limes are a good source of vitamin C and a tart, flavorful addition to many dishes. Squeeze limes on baked chicken, use in a marinade or enjoy in a refreshing glass of Tart Cherry Limeade bursting with lime flavor!

Remember the Green Veggies

Arugula is a nutrient-dense veggie with great sources of dietary fiber, vitamins A, C and K, as well as folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium! You can’t go wrong with this leafy green. Use it as a salad base, avocado toast topper or tossed with pasta like this Lemon Arugula Pasta Salad.

Broccoli contains very good sources of dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C and potassium. You can immerse broccoli in cold water after roasting to preserve the many nutrients it offers.

Green bell peppers are just one of the many bell pepper options. Green bell peppers in particular are slightly sweet and high in dietary fiber, vitamin A and vitamin C. They’re great diced in an omelette, chopped in a salad or stuffed like these Vegetarian Quinoa Stuffed Peppers.

Kale is incredibly nutritious. A one-cup serving provides 133% of the daily value of vitamin A and 134% of the daily value of vitamin C. Plus, there are endless ways to enjoy kale—toss with avocado oil and lemon juice for a nutritious side dish, add to a smoothie, or cook and stuff in a sweet potato for a hearty dish!

Remember to eat the rainbow every day. Check out the red Eat the Rainbow article for more inspiration!


 

Kristina portrait from Love and Zest

About Kristina

Kristina LaRue, RD, CSSD, is the owner of popular food and nutrition website, Love & Zest, where she shares (mostly) healthy recipes to fuel the whole family and real-life stories of modern motherhood. Kristina is a former NBA team dietitian, collegiate sports RD and cookbook author. She’s the mama to two active and hungry boys and lives in Orlando with her middle-school sweetheart. Follow Love & Zest on Instagram, Pinterest and Facebook, and get her new family-friendly weeknight dinner guide for stress-free meal planning.

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How to Prepare, Cook & Eat an Artichoke

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Native to the Mediterranean region, the artichoke is the not-yet-bloomed flower of a thistle plant that is part of the sunflower family. Despite their slightly prickly exterior, artichokes are quite easy to prepare, cook and eat. Plus, they’re packed with antioxidants, vitamin C and dietary fiber.

Preparing an artichoke: Fresh artichokes in a paper bag

Easy Artichoke Prep

  • Because they have sharp barbs, the first thing you’ll want to do in preparation is to cut the top cluster of barbs off with a sharp knife. This will remove about a quarter of the artichoke. Then, utilizing kitchen shears, cut the barbs off the tops of the remaining leaves.

TIP: Don’t worry that you’re taking too much off the top of the artichoke or the tops of the leaves—the edible part is at the base of the leaf. More on that later …

  • Now that the artichoke is easier to handle, remove the small leaves at the base, closest to the stem and cut the stem, leaving about a ½”.
  • The final step is to rinse the artichoke under cool running water to remove any debris that might be trapped in between petals.

Cooking an Artichoke: It’s Easy!

  1. Add just enough water to a pot so that the water is just below the steamer basket. Cover and bring the water to a boil.
  2. Add the prepared artichoke, replace the lid and lower the heat to simmer the water. It will take 20-40 minutes to cook. After 20 minutes, you’ll want to check the artichoke(s) every 5 minutes. The color will change from fresh green to a more muted green and you’ll know it’s read when you can easily remove a petal. TIP: Use tongs for this part—those petals will be really hot!
  3. Set aside and allow to cool a bit before eating it.

Now What? How to Eat an Artichoke

  • Serve the artichoke right-side up on a plate.
  • Remove a petal from the artichoke and eat only the bottom, whitish fleshy part of the petal that was closest to the base of the artichoke.
  • You can certainly eat artichokes plain, or with a little salt & pepper. Try dipping them in melted butter or ghee, a tangy vinaigrette or a savory aioli.

TIP: Have a bowl at-the-ready for discarded petals.

Easy Aioli Recipe

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 Garlic cloves, pressed
  • ¼ tsp. Kosher salt
  • ½ cup Sprouts Organic Mayonnaise
  • 2 Tbsp. Sprouts Organic Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 Tbsp. Fresh lemon juice
  • Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Mash garlic and salt in a small bowl until a paste forms.
  2. Whisk in mayonnaise, oil and lemon juice.
  3. Season with salt and pepper—enjoy!

Did you know?

One artichoke plant can produce up to 20 artichokes per year.

Mindful Consumption: Recycling Facts

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Recycling seems pretty simple. But did you know things like cleanliness and contamination play into the whole system? To help you become a model recycler, we’ll be answering questions like, how clean is clean? And, can those plastic windows in envelopes be included with the paper?


Does recycling really matter?

Yes! Here’s a recycling fact: Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to run a TV for two hours, or a laptop for three hours or light a 100-watt bulb for 20 hours.


The Benefits of Recycling

When we choose to recycle things like paper, cardboard, glass and plastic, we’re sending less material to the landfill. At the same time, when those materials we divert from the landfill are reused, they’re saving other valuable natural resources like water, trees and minerals. Recycling also benefits our economy by creating a domestic source of materials. Last but not least, recycling saves energy.

What Can Be Recycled?

The best answer to this question is: Check locally! Because recycling programs vary from one area to the next, there is no set answer for what materials can be recycled in your neighborhood. The non-profit organization, Keep America Beautiful, has a fantastic website to help you find information on the recycling programs in your area—searchable by zip code!

Recycling facts: Various bottles, cans and newspapers arranged in circular design

Containers

Is it really true that if you don’t clean your plastic, glass or can you ruin it for all the other recycles? Yes and no. If there are still a few schmears of mayo in the jar after you’ve rinsed it out, no harm done. But if the container has not been rinsed at all and/or contains leftover food or liquids, yes, it could contaminate other materials, especially in places that have a single-stream system.

Consider this: An unrinsed food jar could come open or break somewhere in the process. If it gets on paper and cardboard recyclables, they’ll be ruined. You don’t have to spotlessly clean plastics and glass with soap and water, just rinse them so little to no food is left in them. And let them dry too. Wet containers with paper and cardboard aren’t a good combo—soggy items can contaminate a whole bundle of paper products.

Paper

Crumpled paper, newspaper and cardboard are a-okay. Shredded however, in most cases, is not. You can use it in your compost pile as a brown/carbon. As for those pesky plastic windows in paper envelopes? It’s best to remove them before adding the envelope to the recycle bin. (Don’t worry if there is a little sliver of plastic that hangs on.) And unless you can completely separate the paper part of a bubble-wrap mailer from the plastic, those shipping envelopes will need to be reused or thrown in the garbage.

Wishcycling

When you toss something in the recycling bin that you hope is recyclable, but aren’t sure, you’re wishcycling. The trouble with this practice is, if what you’re adding to the recycles truly isn’t recyclable, you run the risk turning vast amounts of potentially recyclable material into trash or at the very least, bringing the process to a halt at the recycling center. Keep in mind, just because something has the chasing arrows symbol on it does not mean it can go in the bin with everything else. Boost your eco-savvy by checking with your local municipality for the rules as to what can be collected in your area.

Can You Recycle Plastic Bags?

Most recycling programs will not take plastic bags, even if it has the recycling logo on it. At Sprouts, we have containers at the front of every store where plastic bags can be recycled. Last year, our customers returned 22 million plastic bags to us, so we could recycle them for you. We also recycled 850,000 pounds of our own mixed recyclables including paper, plastic, aluminum and glass, as well as 80 million pounds of cardboard—that’s equivalent to 450,000 trees!

 


Here’s another recycling fact:

It’s possible to turn an aluminum can into another aluminum product in as little as 60 days!


Explore & Discover Sale

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Explore and Discover Sale

At Sprouts, we’re passionate about bringing you the hottest new and unique products in fresh and natural foods so you can be the first to try them! Come explore and discover hundreds of these exciting products throughout the store while they’re on sale, now through Wednesday, March 6. You’ll find interesting, better-for-you items featuring trending products like grass-fed dairy and local honey, as well as specially sourced ingredients like grain-free cassava flour, heritage breed eggs and plant-based proteins, just to name a few. You’ll also discover products that support dietary preferences such as FODMAP, Whole30®, keto and Paleo.

Products to Explore and Discover on Sale Now!


SHOP SALE


Want to learn more about trends in natural products?

Explore what’s in-store with these resources on popular topics—some that have been the inspiration for new products hitting shelves now for you to discover.

FODMAP

Learn about this acronym for various short-chain carbohydrates, how they can affect digestion and what foods they’re in.

Whole30®

Primal Kitchen sauce

More like a digestive reset, this focus centers around your total health, habits and relationship with food. You can learn more about the Whole30 program and find a great shopping guide in our article by Whole30® founder Melissa Hartwig.

Free-range Eggs

Happy Egg Heritage Breed Eggs

With a continued interest in animal welfare, it’s important to understand where our eggs come from. Learn about what free-range really means and get egg-ucated!

Gluten-free

Siete Grain Free Tortilla Chips

Going gluten-free? Knowing what to look for is half the battle! Get gluten-free tips and recipes in this quick read.

Wild Planet

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Wild PlanetThe Wild Way

Born from a sense of reverence for the natural marine ecosystem, Wild Planet offers consumers a wide variety of premium, sustainably sourced seafood containing abundant essential nutrients. Wildly Good, Wildly Delicious and Wildly good for you! 

Fishing for Change

Because Wild Planet supports selective harvest practices, all tuna is caught by pole and line or trolling methods. Because these methods catch the target species one fish at a time, there is very low incidence of by-catch of other species or juveniles of the target species.  

Wildly Delicious

Wild Planet tuna is cooked right in the can, retaining the nutrient-rich, omega-3 fatty acids and the natural juices—a difference you can taste because there isn’t any added water. Equally delicious and versatile are Wild Planet’s other products—omega-3-rich species such as mackerel, white anchovies and sardines. You’ll also find amazing flavor in the wild salmon products, caught in Alaska by small-scale fishing families.

Home on the Range

Wild Planet believes that a healthy planet is comprised of both living water and living soil. To that end, the company now provides a land-based protein – Organic Roasted Chicken Breast, raised on a diet which includes non-GMO corn grown on land that is free from chemical fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides. These chemicals eventually run off and enter the oceans. Wild Planet’s support of organic farming is a step towards keeping waterways and oceans clean and healthy, and is considered to be the land-based equivalent of sustainable pole and line fishing.

Video Description: Learn how the tuna sourced for Wild Planet by the use of sustainable fishing methods minimizes the bycatch of millions of pristine sea creatures.

Ready to give Wild Planet a try? Check out these easy and family-friendly recipes:

Wild Planet Protein Cheese Melt Bar

Ingredients:

  • Pick your Wild Planet Protein (30z.) Pouch: Albacore, Skipjack, Pink Salmon or Sockeye Salmon
  • Pick your base: bagel, wheat bread, flat bread, tortilla, gluten-free breads, hardy greens (kale, spinach, cabbage slaw, etc)
  • Pick your condiment: Mayo, Aioli, Mustard, Hummus, Guacamole, Olive Tapenade, Olive Oil, etc.
  • Pick Your cheese: American, cheddar, mozzarella, feta, dairy-free options, ect.

Instructions:

  • Assemble protein, condiments and cheese on base and toast in a toaster oven until cheese has melted.

Wild Planet Sustainable Seafood Snack Bar

Ingredients:

  • Pick your Wild Planet Protein: Choose between a variety of deliciously nutritious sustainable sourced seafood – sardines, anchovies, yellowtail, mackerel
  • Pick your base: rice cracker, nut cracker, saltines, baguette, toast, etc (gluten-free options available)
  • Pick your topping: hot sauce, aioli, BBQ Sauce, mustard, mayo, olive tapenade, etc

Instructions:

  • Assemble protein and condiments on base and enjoy!

Wild Planet Organic Chicken Salad

Ingredients:

  • Wild Planet Organic Chicken, 1 can per 1 -2 servings
  • Pico de Gallo, ½ cup per can of chicken
  • Broccoli & Carrot Slaw, use ½ cup per can of chicken
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Instructions:

  • Add and mix together all the chicken and its juices in a bowl.
  • Fold in the pico de gallo and slaw.
  • Taste and season accordingly.
  • Eat or store in fridge for 5-7 days.
  • Tip: This salad makes a fantastic recipe for weekly meal prep!

Suntreat

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The Griffith family has been cultivating citrus in the San Joaquin Valley since 1958. Today, they partner with 150 third- and fourth-generation family farmers to deliver top-quality fruit. All of their citrus is grown in the heart of California’s agricultural region where the fertile soil, warm summers and cool winters are ideal for producing the sweetest fruit.
Suntreat citrus tree

Bringing the Best to You

Utilizing technology, Suntreat is able to trace their fruit from the day it was picked in the grove, until the day it arrives in stores, ensuring food safety. And, automated grading machines make sure the fruit Suntreat ships is always high-quality. The end result: the tastiest citrus! 

Educating Today’s Youth

Suntreat’s Outdoor Education Center creates a place to give back to the community. Linking the past and the future, their 187-tree working citrus grove is part of the Ranch Camp program that honors Orange County’s history while educating today’s youth about the importance of agricultural science.

Sumo Citrus logoSumo Citrus®

Suntreat provides us with juiciest and sweetest Sumo Citrus Mandarins. They’re available—but, only for a limited time! With a rich history dating back to 1970s Japan, these oversized mandarins were bred to combine the easy-to-peel, Japanese Satsuma with the vibrant California orange. Sumo Citrus® have a bumpy, loose peel and sport a topknot with a perfectly balanced, sweet citrus flavor you won’t want to miss.

What Are Prebiotics?

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Though they often get a bad rap, some bacteria are beneficial. Good bacteria you’ve likely heard of include probiotics—microbes that help to digest food and support a healthy gut environment called a microbiome. Just like we can’t exist without eating, neither can probiotics. That’s where prebiotics come in.

Think of prebiotics as the buffet for the healthy gut bacteria. Found in foods, prebiotics help the growth of good gut bacteria by providing nourishment for them. It’s likely you’re already consuming prebiotics, they’re the fiber in some vegetables and grains.

What are prebiotics, asparagusPrebiotic Foods

Inulin is a soluble fiber found in plants. Because of its molecular make-up, inulin cannot be digested by your small intestine—that’s how it continues on to your large intestine to become fuel for beneficial bacteria. If you read food labels, you may have seen inulin listed, that’s because it is added as a source of fiber in things like nutritional bars, yogurt and baked goods. (Chicory root is a major source of inulin and you may have seen that listed in the ingredients as well.) Here are some veggies that contain inulin fiber:

  • Asparagus
  • Garlic
  • Jicama
  • Onions
  • Leeks

Other foods that contain prebiotic fiber include:

  • Barley
  • Bananas
  • Oats
  • Apples
  • Flaxseeds
  • Wheat bran
  • Seaweed

Ready to get more prebiotic-packed foods in your diet?
SHOP NOW

Health Benefits of Citrus Fruits and Juices

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by Mary Ellen Phipps, MPH, RDN, LD founder of milkandhoneynutrition.com

We’re in the middle of winter and many parts of the country are covered in snow. Citrus fruits can offer a fun way to brighten things up any time of year, but especially in these cold winter months.

Citrus fruits include: sweet oranges, mandarins, lemons, limes, grapefruit, and a few other lesser known varieties. Not only do they offer delicious taste, but their vibrant colors can brighten up any dish or beverage. You’ll find a huge variety of citrus at your local Sprouts Farmers Market.

In addition to their great taste and pretty colors, they also come loaded with an abundance of health benefits.

Health Benefits of Citrus Fruits and JuicesNutrients Found in Citrus Fruits

Likely the most well-known nutrient in citrus fruits is vitamin C, which can be found in all citrus fruits. In fact, just one medium orange or grapefruit provides 100% of your daily vitamin C needs.

Citrus fruits also contain the B vitamins thiamin, niacin and B6.

And potassium, an electrolyte essential for human health, is found in citrus fruits, along with phosphorus and magnesium.

Other nutrients to make note of in citrus fruits include antioxidants such as flavonoids and carotenoids.

Potential Health Benefits of Citrus Fruits

Given the powerhouse of nutrients found in citrus fruits, it’s no surprise that there are a lot of potential health benefits when it comes to citrus and their (no-added-sugar) juice counterparts.

Heart Health

Several of the nutrients found in citrus fruits help support a healthy heart and cardiovascular system. Specifically: vitamin C, soluble fiber and flavonoids. In addition, multiple studies have found lower rates of heart disease in people who consume higher amounts of citrus fruits as part of an overall balanced diet. Both the fruits themselves and juices have been found to have positive effects on heart health when consumed in appropriate amounts.

Cancer Risk Reduction

Numerous studies have found that citrus fruits and the nutrients they contain may offer protection against certain types of cancer including: lung, esophageal, breast, stomach and pancreatic cancers. This is likely due to antioxidant activity (certain types of both flavonoids and carotenoids can act as antioxidants) to inhibit cancer growth and repair cell damage, as well as the fiber content. Diets higher in fiber are associated with lower cancer rates.

Brain Health

Some research has shown that citrus fruits may protect our brains against inflammatory conditions like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Flavonoids (specifically hesperidin), found in abundance in citrus fruits, may slow the rate of deterioration, while also delaying the onset of these conditions.

Bone Health

Vitamin C, potassium and magnesium (all found in citrus fruits) play an important role in bone structure, density and strength. And while calcium and vitamin D aren’t found naturally in large amounts in citrus fruits, the vitamin C content of citrus fruits can help increase the amount of calcium and vitamin D we are able to absorb from other foods. This why 100% orange juice is sometimes fortified with calcium and vitamin D.

Kidney Health

People who eat less citrus fruits tend to have higher rates of kidney stones. One type of kidney stone is caused by low levels of citrate in urine. Consuming citrus fruits can help raise the levels of citrate in urine, and thus may help decrease the risk of developing kidney stones.

Iron Absorption

It is hard for our bodies to absorb all of the iron we consume in food. In fact, it’s impossible. Depending on the source of the iron, our bodies will only absorb about 14–18% of the iron in our foods, but consuming vitamin C (which is found in large amounts in citrus foods) at the same time can increase the amount of iron your body is able to absorb.

Immune System Support

Many citrus fruits are in season in the winter time, which also happens to be the heart of cold and flu season. Consuming citrus fruits and juices can increase your intake of vitamin C, flavonoids and carotenoids which help support healthy immune systems by fighting inflammation and helping your body’s cells communicate with each other.

Skin Health

Citrus fruits and juices can improve skin health because of their high vitamin C content. Vitamin C helps protect our body’s cells from damage, and even helps the cells repair themselves. People who consume more vitamin C may have a lower risk of skin damage from the sun (though you should always wear sunscreen!). Your body also uses vitamin C to build collagen which improves skin elasticity and tone.

Respiratory Health

Several studies have linked the symptoms associated with asthma and citrus fruit consumption. Both Both vitamin C and flavonoids, may play a role in decreasing the frequency of asthma attacks and/or improving its symptoms.

Diabetes Prevention and Management

Believe it or not, eating fruit is not bad for people with diabetes and it does not increase your risk for diabetes. Studies have shown over and over that people who eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, specifically those higher in vitamin C and fiber, have a lower risk of diabetes. It also should be noted that vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and may help prevent or reduce the amount if inflammation present in people with diabetes.

So, whether it’s a grapefruit, lemon, tangerine or glass of 100% orange juice, rest assured you’ll do your body some good by reaching for those citrus fruits the next time you’re in the Sprouts Produce Department!


Please note: The information contained in this article is not intended to treat, cure, or diagnose any medical condition and should not be treated as such. Please seek out your physician or dietitian before making changes to your diet.


 

Influencer - Mary Ellen - Milk & Honey Nutrition

About Mary Ellen

Mary Ellen Phipps, MPH, RDN, LD, is the Registered Dietitian, mom, food blogger and recipe developer behind milkandhoneynutrition.com. She’s also a type 1 diabetic and firmly believes food should bring us joy, not stress. Mary Ellen makes healthy eating easy, realistic and most importantly … fun! Visit her website and you’ll find yummy low-sugar, diabetes-friendly recipes the whole family will love … as well as helpful tips and a little mom humor.

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What is Fair Trade?

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Fair Trade coffee beans with farmerAs a consumer, every purchase you make is a vote within the market place. You have the ability to influence not only which products you see on shelves, but also where those products come from and how they’re made. When you choose fair trade products and ingredients, you help improve the lives of farmers, farm-workers, producers and their families. You’ll also be making an eco-friendly choice.

10 Principles of Fair Trade Products*

The ten principles of fair trade help to create a model of sustainable, ethical trade that puts people and planet first. Purchasing dedicated fair trade brands is the easiest way to do the most good, every day.

  1. Opportunities for disadvantaged producers
  2. Transparency & accountability
  3. Fair trade practices
  4. Fair payment
  5. No child labor, no forced labor
  6. No discrimination, gender equity, freedom of association
  7. Good working conditions
  8. Capacity building
  9. Promote fair trade
  10. Respect for the environment

*Courtesy of the World Fair Trade Organization website.

Keep an eye out for these fair trade logos …

Fair Trade logos to look out for

 


Did you know?

The Fair Trade movement started in the United States in 1946. You can read more about the history of the fair trade movement on the World Fair Trade Organization website.